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A pharmacological evidence of positive association between mouse intermale aggression and brain serotonin metabolism.

TitleA pharmacological evidence of positive association between mouse intermale aggression and brain serotonin metabolism.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsKulikov, AV, Osipova, DV, Naumenko, VS, Terenina, E, Mormède, P, Popova, NK
JournalBehav Brain Res
Volume233
Issue1
Pagination113-9
Date Published2012 Jul 15
ISSN1872-7549
KeywordsAggression, Animals, Brain, Electrochemistry, Enzyme Inhibitors, Exploratory Behavior, Fenclonine, Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Polymorphism, Genetic, Serotonin, Tryptophan, Tryptophan Hydroxylase
Abstract

The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in the regulation of mouse intermale aggression. Previously, it was shown that intensity of mouse intermale aggression was positively associated with activity of the key enzyme of 5-HT synthesis - tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) in mouse brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pharmacological activation or inhibition of 5-HT synthesis in the brain on intermale aggression in two mouse strains differing in the TPH2 activity: C57BL/6J (B6, high TPH2 activity, high aggressiveness) and CC57BR/Mv (BR, low TPH2 activity, low aggressiveness). Administration of 5-HT precursor L-tryptophan (300 mg/kg, i.p.) to BR mice significantly increased the 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in the midbrain as well as the number of attacks and their duration in the resident-intruder test. And vice versa, administration of TPH2 inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (300 mg/kg, i.p., for 3 consecutive days) to B6 mice dramatically reduced the 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents in brain structures and attenuated the frequency and the duration of aggressive attacks. At the same time, L-tryptophan or pCPA did not influence the percentage of aggressive mice and the attack latency reflecting the threshold of aggressive reaction. This result indicated that the intensity of intermale aggression, but not the threshold of aggressive reaction is positively dependent on 5-HT metabolism in mouse brain.

DOI10.1016/j.bbr.2012.04.031
Alternate JournalBehav. Brain Res.
PubMed ID22561036