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Pathogen Challenge and Dietary Shift Alter Microbiota Composition and Activity in a Mucin-Associated Model of the Piglet Colon (MPigut-IVM) Simulating Weaning Transition.

TitlePathogen Challenge and Dietary Shift Alter Microbiota Composition and Activity in a Mucin-Associated Model of the Piglet Colon (MPigut-IVM) Simulating Weaning Transition.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsGresse, R, Chaucheyras-Durand, F, Garrido, JJ, Denis, S, Jiménez-Marín, A, Beaumont, M, Van de Wiele, T, Forano, E, Blanquet-Diot, S
JournalFront Microbiol
Volume12
Pagination703421
Date Published2021
ISSN1664-302X
Abstract

Enterotoxigenic (ETEC) is the principal pathogen responsible for post-weaning diarrhea in newly weaned piglets. Expansion of ETEC at weaning is thought to be the consequence of various stress factors such as transient anorexia, dietary change or increase in intestinal inflammation and permeability, but the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. As the use of animal experiments raise more and more ethical concerns, we used a recently developed model of piglet colonic microbiome and mucobiome, the MPigut-IVM, to evaluate the effects of a simulated weaning transition and pathogen challenge at weaning. Our data suggested that the tested factors impacted the composition and functionality of the MPigut-IVM microbiota. The simulation of weaning transition led to an increase in relative abundance of the family which was further promoted by the presence of the ETEC strain. In contrast, several beneficial families such as or and gut health related short chain fatty acids like butyrate or acetate were reduced upon simulated weaning. Moreover, the incubation of MPigut-IVM filtrated effluents with porcine intestinal cell cultures showed that ETEC challenge in the model led to an increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes by the porcine cells. This study provides insights about the etiology of a dysbiotic microbiota in post-weaning piglets.

DOI10.3389/fmicb.2021.703421
Alternate JournalFront Microbiol
PubMed ID34349744
PubMed Central IDPMC8328230