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The intestinal microbial composition in Greylag geese differs with steatosis induction mode: spontaneous or induced by overfeeding.

TitleThe intestinal microbial composition in Greylag geese differs with steatosis induction mode: spontaneous or induced by overfeeding.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsKnudsen, C, Arroyo, J, Even, M, Cauquil, L, Pascal, G, Fernandez, X, Lavigne, F, Davail, S, Combes, S, Ricaud, K
JournalAnim Microbiome
Volume3
Issue1
Pagination6
Date Published2021 Jan 06
ISSN2524-4671
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Relationships between microbial composition and steatosis are being extensively studied in mammals, and causal relations have been evidenced. In migratory birds the liver can transiently store lipids during pre-migratory and migratory phases, but little is known about the implications of the digestive microbiota in those mechanisms. The Landaise greylag goose (Anser anser) is a good model to study steatosis in migratory birds as it is domesticated, but is still, from a genetic point of view, close to its wild migratory ancestor. It also has a great ingestion capacity and a good predisposition for hepatic steatosis, whether spontaneous or induced by conventional overfeeding. The conventional (overfeeding) and alternative (spontaneous steatosis induction) systems differ considerably in duration and feed intake level and previous studies have shown that aptitudes to spontaneous steatosis are very variable. The present study thus aimed to address two issues: (i) evaluate whether microbial composition differs with steatosis-inducing mode; (ii) elucidate whether a digestive microbial signature could be associated with variable aptitudes to spontaneous liver steatosis.

RESULTS: Performances, biochemical composition of the livers and microbiota differed considerably in response to steatosis stimulation. We namely identified the genus Romboutsia to be overrepresented in birds developing a spontaneous steatosis in comparison to those submitted to conventional overfeeding while the genera Ralstonia, Variovorax and Sphingomonas were underrepresented only in birds that did not develop a spontaneous steatosis compared to conventionally overfed ones, birds developing a spontaneous steatosis having intermediate values. Secondly, no overall differences in microbial composition were evidenced in association with variable aptitudes to spontaneous steatosis, although one OTU, belonging to the Lactobacillus genus, was overrepresented in birds having developed a spontaneous steatosis compared to those that had not.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study is the first to evaluate the intestinal microbial composition in association with steatosis, whether spontaneous or induced by overfeeding, in geese. Steatosis induction modes were associated with distinct digestive microbial compositions. However, unlike what can be observed in mammals, no clear microbial signature associated with spontaneous steatosis level was identified.

DOI10.1186/s42523-020-00067-z
Alternate JournalAnim Microbiome
PubMed ID33499980